Collège Royal
   The present-day Collège de France has long regarded itself as the descendant of the pre-revolutionary Collège Royal and traces its foundation back to a group of lecturers appointed by King Francis I in 1530 to promote humanistic studies in France. In reality, however, the king merely appointed four leading scholars to teach publicly in Paris on the humanistic subjects to which each was assigned. These lectureships had an ill-defined and often troubled relationship with the well-established and predominantly anti-humanist University of Paris, which tried to establish its own super-visory power, guaranteed by its 13th-century charter, over all higher-level teaching in Paris. Two of the initial lecturers taught Greek and two taught Hebrew, the biblical languages. Additional appointments in the next few years added lectures in mathematics and in classical (that is, Ciceronian) Latin. The so-called Collège had no corporate structure, no degree-granting function, and until the early 17th century not even a building of its own: the lectures were held in various buildings of the university.
   The king's act in initiating this series of lectureships was partly the result of agitation by French humanists, especially Guillaume Budé, who were inspired by the founding of trilingual (Latin-Greek-Hebrew) colleges at Alcalá in Spain and Louvain in the Netherlands. Francis, who fancied himself a great patron of arts and letters, announced a plan to create a similar French institution as early as 1517, but his political and territorial ambitions, which involved him in costly wars, delayed the first steps toward fulfillment of the plan until 1530.

Historical Dictionary of Renaissance. . 2004.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Collège royal — Collège de France 48°50′57″N 2°20′44″E / 48.84917, 2.34556 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • College royal de medecine — Collège royal de médecine Traduction terminée Royal College of Physicians → …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Collège Royal de Médecine — Traduction terminée Royal College of Physicians → …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Collège royal Henri-le-Grand — Collège Henri IV (de La Flèche) Le Collège Henri IV (connu également comme Collège royal Henri le Grand) était un célèbre collège jésuite fondé à La Flèche (Sarthe, France) en 1603 par le roi Henri IV. Après l’expulsion des jésuites de France, en …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Collège royal de France — Collège de France 48°50′57″N 2°20′44″E / 48.84917, 2.34556 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • College royal de Curepipe — Collège royal de Curepipe Le Collège royal de Curepipe est un monument de la ville de Curepipe, à Maurice. Pendant la période française, il s appelait Collège national et était situé à Port Louis. Lorsque l île Maurice fut prise par les Anglais,… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Collège Royal de Curepipe — Le Collège royal de Curepipe est un monument de la ville de Curepipe, à Maurice. Pendant la période française, il s appelait Collège national et était situé à Port Louis. Lorsque l île Maurice fut prise par les Anglais, son nom fut changé en… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Collège royal de curepipe — Le Collège royal de Curepipe est un monument de la ville de Curepipe, à Maurice. Pendant la période française, il s appelait Collège national et était situé à Port Louis. Lorsque l île Maurice fut prise par les Anglais, son nom fut changé en… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • College royal preparatoire aux techniques aeronautiques — Collège royal préparatoire aux techniques aéronautiques Le Collège royal préparatoire aux techniques aéronautiques ou CRPTA est un lycée d excellence qui se trouve à Marrakech. Le dernier établissement public marocain à enseigner les matières… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Collège Royal Préparatoire Aux Techniques Aéronautiques — Le Collège royal préparatoire aux techniques aéronautiques ou CRPTA est un lycée d excellence qui se trouve à Marrakech. Le dernier établissement public marocain à enseigner les matières scientifiques en français. Sélection La sélection à l… …   Wikipédia en Français

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”